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HOW TO Establish Authority In Social Media

This is a guestpost from Jane Sheeba (@janesheeba). She writes a fantastic blog at Problogging Success giving blogging tips. More about her at the bottom of the post.

Social media is making itself the next most favorite location for every blogger to reach. There is no doubt that it has been much time since every person associated with the online industry has been talking about the much hyped scope of these social networking sites, and with time, they have proved to be right.

Time has seen many self-proclaimed social media experts evolving with the evolution of this industry. So, who are these experts? What made them the authority of social media and who taught them the golden rules of social media? Well the answer is – I don’t know; but what I know with certainty is that anyone can be a social media expert, an authority, by simply being a little logical.

Here are a few key points to keep in your mind when you approach towards that coveted seat –

Aesthetics

First impression might not be the last impression but it definitely is the source of attraction and reliability for many. You wouldn’t like to take advices on business from a person who wears torn clothes, regardless of how good he might be. What about a guy in a suit? Same is with social media.

Make yourself a beautiful profile which might suggest people that you have some credibility and you are not here just for fun.

Patience is the key

You would have come across a number of jobs which require patience and provide fruits only after some quality time spent on it; social media is definitely one of them. Bloggers may know the importance of taking steps slowly to succeed on internet instead of rushing things to get faster following.

Remember, if internet has the ability to get you quick fame in no time then it also has the power to defame you in that same instant. Becoming an authority takes time. People don’t start respecting your views overnight. So, my advice is to be a little patient and be persistent.

Build trust not connections

It is true that you need to form connections and professional relationships through social media to succeed but what lies in the bottom of these two things is trust. If you start spamming people’s walls/inboxes/scrapbooks or anything like that, then it is highly unlikely that they would listen to you when you really need them to.

Learn to say no

I know that this one can be a little difficult. Why would you not like to add another person to your friends’ list when he can add into the numbers? Well I think I have already answered the question in its body – because it adds into the numbers and merely into the numbers only.

There is no point in having 500 followers, if only 50 of them follow you actually. The remaining 450 will only bring you bad word of mouth and the large number would only hamper your attempts to get closer to the real 50. Hence, It is better to connect only with those who you feel will add something to the quality and not to the quantity.

Be what you are and learn to stand for it

This may be most useful one while actually connecting with your followers, while indulging in discussions with them, while developing the content for your blog or while sending a tweet to all of your followers. People respect you for what you are, for what you believe in and for what you stand for; not for anything else.

So, instead of simply mentioning what others think, dare to add your inputs and create your own space by saying it loud that you are a person with a clear view point.

What do you think? How do people become authorities in Social Media for you?

 

Jane runs a self help blog Problogging Success on Blogging Tips, Social Media and Email Marketing. She is part of the team at Coupon Triumph promoting Bistro MD and Diet to go coupons and wants to let you know about bistro md promotion and diettogo coupon.

Want to write a guestpost here too? Email me leo@bufferapp.com

Photocredit: toolstop,

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